The introduction of computers is revolutionizing the field of genetics. 

Researchers are now able to quickly and accurately analyze vast amounts of genetic data, and make novel discoveries at an unprecedented rate. Thanks to powerful computer analyses and searches, scientists are uncovering all kinds of mysterious viruses, some so old they have been lurking in ancient genetic code for thousands of years. In this article, we’ll take a look at some of the novel viruses that have been unearthed using computers, as well as how scientists are using modern computing technology to better understand viruses and the human genome.

A Brief Overview of Computers in Genetics

Genetics is the study of DNA and the way genes form, interact and affect living organisms. In the last few decades, advances in computer technology have made the study of genetics much easier. With modern computers, researchers are able to access and analyze huge amounts of data more accurately and quickly than ever before.

Modern computers can quickly and accurately search vast amounts of data for specific patterns, allowing scientists to make novel discoveries they wouldn’t have been able to make in the past. This has led to some incredible breakthroughs in genetics, such as the discovery of new and ancient viruses. In this article, we will take a look at some of the novel viruses that have been discovered using modern computer technology.

A Look at Novel Viruses Uncovered with Computers

  1. Human Torque Teno Virus (hTTV): This virus was discovered in 2008 after a computer-aided search of the human genome. It is a type of circular single-stranded DNA virus, and it has been found in the human intestine and has been linked to both acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases.

  2. OXV-1: This virus was discovered in 2012 after researchers used computers to analyze the genomes of two species of eucalyptus trees. OXV-1 is a novel single-stranded circular DNA virus, and it was the first virus to be discovered in eucalyptus trees.

  3. Ectocarpus siliculosus Parvovirus 1 (ESPV-1): This virus was discovered in 2013 after a computer-aided search of the genome of the kelp E. siliculosus. ESPV-1 is a circular single-stranded DNA virus, and it is the first parvovirus to be discovered in a marine organism.

  4. Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1): This virus was discovered in 2014 after a computer-aided search of the genome of the protozoan Paramecium. PBCV-1 is a circular single-stranded DNA virus and it is the first virus to be discovered in a protozoan organism.

  5. Gammapapillomavirus: Gammapapillomavirus is a novel virus discovered in 2017 by researchers using computer analysis to search for novel viruses in the human genome. The virus is a circular single-stranded DNA virus, and it has been linked to a number of diseases in humans, including skin cancer and cervical cancer.

  6. Zika virus: The Zika virus was discovered in 2015 after a computer-aided search of the genome of the Aedes aegypti mosquito. The virus is a circular single-stranded RNA virus, and it has been linked to a number of health issues in humans including microcephaly and Guillain-Barré Syndrome.

Applications of Computers in Genetics 

While computers have proven to be a powerful tool for discovering novel viruses, they also have a number of other applications in genetics. For example, they can be used to compare the genomes of different species in order to identify similarities and differences between them. Computers can also be used to study gene expression, which is the way in which genes are activated or deactivated in different cells. This can be used to study gene regulation, and to better understand how different genes interact with each other.

The introduction of computers has revolutionized the field of genetics. Thanks to powerful computer technologies, researchers are able to quickly and accurately analyze vast amounts of data, allowing for rapid and novel discoveries. With computers, scientists are able to uncover all kinds of mysterious viruses, some so old they have been lurking in genetic code for thousands of years. From discovering novel viruses, to better understanding gene expression and gene regulation, computers are an invaluable tool in genetics today, and they are sure to revolutionize the field in the years to come.